The Twins, graphite and ink on paper, 30 x 20 inches, 2015, Courtesy G. Gibson Gallery

Upcoming exhibit at Whitworth- Gala Bent: Everything Seems to Be Coming Together

Share this story!
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
The Twins, graphite and ink on paper, 30 x 20 inches, 2015, Courtesy G. Gibson Gallery
The Twins, graphite and ink on paper, 30 x 20 inches,
2015, Courtesy G. Gibson Gallery

Whitworth University’s spring art exhibit, “Gala Bent: Everything Seems to Be Coming Together,” will run Feb. 9-April 1 in the Lied Center for the Visual Arts on campus.

According to an announcement, “the exhibition features a selection of recent bodies of work by Gala Bent, along with a group of new pieces that continue to explore the harmonies and dissonances that make the shape of the world around us.”

“Bent’s paintings, drawings and objects seek to reflect the inevitable strain that forms when the systems that we inherit and create meet with resistance. Some people glory in that messy place, while others attempt to make new structures to hold tension in balance,” the announcement continued.

Gallery hours will be from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. MondayFriday, and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturdays. An opening reception will be held on Feb. 9, from 5-6 p.m. in the Lied Center for the Visual Arts, followed by an artist’s lecture from 6-7 p.m. in Room 102 of the Lied Center.

Tracy Simmons

About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 15 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash. She is also a Journalism Instructor at Washington State University.

She also writes for The Spokesman-Review and for the Religion News Service.

Visit My Website
View All Posts

Check Also

Report: People who are highly spiritual tend to be more civic-minded

People who identify as highly spiritual are more likely to say it’s important to make a difference in their communities and contribute to the greater good, a broad new study on American spirituality finds.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *