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Water down this word and anything (bad) becomes possible

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By Mark Azzara
Dear Friend,

What’s the opposite of doing evil? Doing good, right? Except that we have really twisted the word “good” (or “goodness”) into something that no longer even vaguely resembles the truth. We define “good” as the opposite of bad rather than the opposite of evil. We try to do good on our own and are satisfied if the result makes things better (i.e., less bad). And we then take personal satisfaction in having done something good after redefining good by our own standards. But we also have reduced good to a place on a list that goes terrible, poor, fair, good, great, which leads to the gigantic lie we repackage as a motivational axiom: “Good isn’t good enough.” In both cases, our understanding of good is flawed because we have forgotten that “God alone is good.” Try living up to that standard and see how well you do.

All God’s blessings – Mark

 

Mark Azzara

About Mark Azzara

Mark Azzara spent 45 years in print journalism, most of them with the Waterbury Republican in Connecticut, where he was a features writer with a special focus on religion at the time of his retirement. He also worked for newspapers in New Haven and Danbury, Conn. At the latter paper, while sports editor, he won a national first-place writing award on college baseball. Azzara also has served as the only admissions recruiter for a small Catholic college in Connecticut and wrote a self-published book on spirituality, "And So Are You." He is active in his church and facilitates two Christian study groups for men. Azzara grew up in southern California, graduating from Cal State Los Angeles. He holds a master's degree from the University of Connecticut.

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One comment

  1. Problem is there’s absosmurfly nothing new about this. What the Greeks caller “arete” and the Romans “virtuus” (wherefrom we rather sloppily derive the word “virtue”) referred to “suitability for a particular purpose.” When we gave up on the idea that all human beings had the exact same purpose (sometime around Plato), I’m not at all certain that, post-teleologically, the notion of a gereral category of “goodness” even makes any sense.

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