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Panelists and guests for the December Coffee Talk

VIDEO: Coffee Talk — The State of Religion Reporting Today

VIDEO: Coffee Talk – The State of Religion Reporting Today

FāVs recently launched a campaign to raise money specifically to pay its team of specialized journalists. A gift of $100 will allow FāVS and its journalists to keep researching, writing and publishing fact-based news stories that impact us all, however a gift of any amount helps!

December’s Coffee Talk was on Religion Reporting and featured a panel of religion reporters and columnists. See the video above!

Panelists were:

Join Coffee Talk for free on Dec. 4 at 10 a.m. PST at this link!

FāVs recently launched a campaign to raise money specifically to pay its team of specialized journalists. A gift of $100 will allow FāVS and its journalists to keep researching, writing and publishing fact-based news stories that impact us all, however a gift of any amount helps!

About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 15 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash. She is also a Scholarly Assistant Professor at Washington State University.

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