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Saying Hello: The New Kid on the Block

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By Scott McIntyre

Step aside duck and cover.  There’s a new practice in town; stop and talk.  Duck and cover was a phrase, popular in the 1950s, to describe the immediate actions necessary to protect yourself in the event of a nuclear explosion. Stop and talk could be even more important.

We’ve likely all said, “Hi, how are you,” or something similar, as we walked toward someone at work.  Not waiting for an answer, the reply often came from behind us after our co-worker passed by.  About six years ago, while working for the University of California, I tried ‘stop and talk’ instead.

It started the same way, “Hi, how are you,” but the similarity ended there.  By slowing my pace as I started the greeting, I was comfortably able to stop before passing my co-worker.  My stopping caused them to cease forward motion too and suddenly, for a few moments, we found ourselves conversing.

This is not earth-shattering communication magic. It was just caring enough about someone to give them a few seconds of undivided attention. Since then, I’ve tried to make this more of a regular practice and have enjoyed numerous situations where conversations blossomed when I least expected one.

How about you? Is Stop and Talk something you could do? Could it be something we should do?

Scott McIntyre

About Scott McIntyre

Scott McIntyre is glad his parents didn’t name him Vladimir or he’d be listed last on this page. While a long time California resident, he was the Oakland Spirituality Examiner for Examiner.com from 2011-12 and about the same time began blogging on several topics. The first, teaching Christians how to lovingly share their spiritual beliefs, emphasized skills that can benefit all forms of one-to-one interaction. He also writes on marriage, travel, downsizing, humor, and the motive behind people’s words and actions. After retiring in 2016, Scott embarked on some major ‘R & R’; Relocating and Rebranding. Following in his sister’s footsteps from the early 80’s, and later in the decade, his parent’s, Scott left the Golden State to become a Washingtonian in a small town just west of Spokane County.

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