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POEM: The mother or the egg?

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By Christi Ortiz

I have been told that a mother actually holds the eggs
of her future grand babies in her womb
as the developing fetus, her daughter
holds the eggs that she will carry for a lifetime

Perhaps this is symbolic of the role we hold in this life
Like the woman that is both held in the womb
and carries the potential for life within her own

We too are held in the womb of God
Gifted with the spark of life
and held in compassionate care

Also instilled with the power of life
Called to emulate the love received
Called to an image and likeness beyond our own

To be a conduit of grace
a cycle of love
a ‘theotokos’, God bearer

Called to open the vastness within
to birth Grace
even as we too are born of Grace

What comes first,
the mother or the egg?
Or are they both born together?

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About Christi Ortiz

Christi Ortiz
Christi Ortiz is a licensed marriage and family therapist by profession and a poet by passion.  She enjoys trying to put to words to that which is wordless and give voice to the dynamic and wild spiritual journey called life. She lives in Spokane with her husband and two children, Emmanuel and Grace. She loves the outdoors and meditating in the early mornings which gives rise to her poetry.

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