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Handwritten, Heritage Saint John’s Bible to be on display at St. John’s Cathedral

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On Oct. 26, at 9:15 a.m. Brad Neary, heritage program director of The Saint John’s Bible Heritage Edition will present a lecture at The Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist on the creation of the first handwritten, illuminated Bible to be commissioned since the invention of the printing press. He will bring a copy of The Gospel and The Book of Acts for display, which will used as part of the 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. worship services at the Cathedral.

Known as the Saint John’s Bible, the Benedictine monks of St John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville, Minn. began work in 1998 under the direction of a scribe to Queen Elizabeth’s Crown Office in the House of Lords, completing it in September 2011. Using the New Revised Standard Version of the text, each page is completely hand-lettered. Illumination styles range from the medieval to the contemporary, according to a press release.

Once the original work had been completed, the limited edition of the Heritage Saint John’s Bible was prepared. It is a full-sized, fine art reproduction of the original masterpiece and is made up of seven volumes. The Gospels and the Book of Acts will be on display in the Great Hall at the cathedral.

The complete handwritten illuminated St John’s Bible has 1,150 pages and is made up of seven volumes. Each volume is approximately 2 feet tall by 3 feet wide when open. Individual volumes weigh between 13 pounds to nearly 20 pounds. The Heritage edition is identical in size and weight to the original.

When not on exhibition at major museums, The Saint John’s Bible resides at the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library on the Saint John’s University campus in Minnesota.

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About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 15 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash. She is also a Scholarly Assistant Professor at Washington State University.

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