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Gonzaga to present film, “A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle For A Living Planet”

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afiercegreenfireGonzaga University’s environmental studies department will presents a screening of the film “A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a Living Planet” along with a discussion of the film with director Mark Kitchell, from 5:30-8 p.m., Nov. 4 in the Jepson Center’s Wolff Auditorium.

“A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a Living Planet” is the first big-picture exploration of the environmental movement, marked by grassroots and global activism spanning 50 years, from conservation to climate change, according to a press release.

Among the efforts the film depicts struggles to halt dams in the Grand Canyon, battle 20,000 tons of toxic waste at Love Canal, Greenpeace’s whale-saving initiatives, and efforts by Chico Mendes and others to save the Amazon Rainforest. Kitchell also directed and produced the Academy Award-nominated documentary “Berkeley in the Sixties,” (1990) which chronicles generation-shaping student political protest at the University of California, Berkeley.

The free event is open to the public.

About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 15 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash. She is also a Scholarly Assistant Professor at Washington State University.

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