Forgive or Forget? A SpokaneFāVS Community Discussion coming up Today

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SpokaneFāVS (Spokane Faith & Values) will host its bimonthly Coffee Talk conversation Saturday, Aug. 5 at Saranac Commons (19 W. Main Ave, Spokane). Beginning at 10 a.m. a group of panelists will lead a community discussion about forgiving and forgetting.

Panelists are SpokaneFāVS writers Patricia Bruininks, who teaches psychology at Whitworth, poet Christi Ortiz and guest panelist Melissa Opel of the Spokane Buddhist Temple and Carla Peperzak, who helped hide Jews during the Holocaust.

Coffee Talk brings relevant and difficult topics to the community for thought-provoking discussion. SpokaneFāVS takes the news beyond the standard format to generate lively discussion between readers and religious leaders in the community. Coffee Talks address challenging topics such as religion and ethics. This month, the focus of Coffee Talk will focus on how to respond to difficult circumstances. What is the role of forgiveness? Is it necessary and/or responsible to forget? Tracy Simmons, the executive director of SpokaneFAVS, will moderate the event.

SpokaneFāVS has hosted more than 35 Coffee Talks since 2013 at a variety of local Spokane coffee shops. SpokaneFāVS enjoys supporting local businesses. Coffee Talks draws 25-40 people to each event in addition to hundreds of views the event receives on Facebook’s live video feature.

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About Rachel Rogers

Rachel Rogers is a recent alumna of Whitworth University where she earned a degree in Communications. She is originally from Portland, Oregon but fell in love with Spokane over the last three years. While Rogers grew up in a Christian home, her parents challenged her beliefs and inspired her to learn about other religions as well. She desired to intern with SpokaneFāVS so she could dive deeper into her Spokane community.

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