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How Journalists Are Not ‘Seeking the Truth and Reporting It’ with UI Homicides

university of idaho

Reporters are supposed to find the news, tease out rumor and innuendo to report facts; but too many reporters covering the story are using rumor as the basics of their stories. Too many are using words like “terrible” and “horrifying” in their work. I’m sorry, but: Duh. Of course the story is, they do not need to state the obvious. Following the memorial service at UI, too many reporters leaped onto the innuendo for their stories. One Spokane TV reporter speculating the crowd was uneasy because, “They did not know if the murderer was right next to them.” Talk about irresponsible reporting, that is a prime example. OK, I get it – the information is slow to come out. The police are protecting what information and leads they have. They absolutely do not want to jeopardize this case when it goes to court.

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The Crucibles of Life Mold Us for Better and Worse

crucible of life

A good day. Maybe you know what that is. I thought I did. I've since changed my mind. My idea of a good time eventually drug me through the worst hell I have ever known. A hell so deep and dark it could have only been made worse by having to crawl through it alone. I have yet to see a greater affinity of friends than ones made in the abscessed corners of misery.

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Ask a Muslim: Is Wearing a Hijab OK if Not a Muslim?

ask a muslim

In my view, head covering is a symbol of modesty related clothing. So, if you chose to wear hijab as part of head covering, it’s fine. Throughout the Muslim world, from Malaysia to Egypt, head coverings are worn in variant ways and styles. Nowadays, young Muslim fashion designers have reimagined the hijab. Some of those names are like Jenahara Nasution, Rabia Z, Hanadi Chehab and Howayda Moussaka.

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The National Christmas Tree turns 100 this year. Here are five faith facts to know.

National christmas tree

A church choir sang, Marine band members played and the president of the United States pressed a button to light the first National Christmas Tree under the gaze of thousands of onlookers. For 100 years, the tree has represented a symbol of civil religion as Americans mark the Christmas season. Yesterday (Nov. 30), President Joe Biden did the honors just as President Calvin Coolidge did at that first lighting, and contemporary gospel singer Yolanda Adams sang for the crowds gathered on the Ellipse in the shadow of the White House.

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