Chase Youth Awards/Luke Grayson

Chase Youth Awards recognizes Freeman High

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By Luke Grayson

Earlier this month hundreds of youth, both in groups and alone were honored for their work in the community. In categories of Arts and Creativity, Compassion, Community Involvement, Cultural Awareness, Innovation, Leadership, Personal Achievement, and Social Advocacy, youth were awarded by age group in Elementary, Teen, Elementary group and Teen group.

One by one our communities youth were announced as the best in their groups for things like organizing projects, reaching out and standing up for other kids, working with organizations, working hard and overcoming unfathomable tragedies.

When the Personal Achievement for a teen group was announced nearly everyone in the audience held their breath knowing this group of kids was the clear decision, this group of kids dealt with something no one should ever have to and came back to change the culture in their school to prevent something like this from ever happening again.

 

Freeman High School Associated Student Body and Survivors: Jackson Clark, Konner Freudenthal, Jordyn Goldsmith, Gracie Jensen, Andrew McGill, Emma Nees, Abby Ofenloch, Dylan Pavlischak, Marley Pratt, and Maggie Bailey, walked to the stage as the overflowing room applauded them with a standing ovation for surviving and persevering through what no person, no child should ever have to.
Luke Grayson

About Luke Grayson

Luke Grayson is a 20-something nonbinary transperson who has been in Spokane since 2012 and is an advocate for the LGBT community and for transgender youth.
He is currently helping raise kids and trying to make schools more inclusive and accepting of transgender youth. He is also attempting to help make the local community more inclusive of both the LGB and transgender communities.
Luke is also a slam (performance) poet who went to Atlanta for National competition last year as a part of a team representing Spokane.
Luke uses he/him or they/them pronouns.

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