Home / News / BRIEF: Whitworth implements compost tea program
Compost teas/storebukkebruse - Flickr

BRIEF: Whitworth implements compost tea program

Share this story!
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

 

Compost teas/storebukkebruse - Flickr
Compost teas/storebukkebruse – Flickr

Whitworth Facilities Services is implementing a compost tea program as part of the university’s commitment toward a more sustainable campus, according to a press release.

Compost tea, once applied to the ground, works to create healthier soil. The compost tea program will provide a more economical and sustainable way to fertilize the campus grounds, and will allow the university to phase out synthetic fertilizers.

“Our team hopes to eventually see the complete elimination of artificial fertilizers and herbicides used on campus,” said Fred Johnston, Whitworth resource conservation manager, in a press release. “We want the Whitworth community to enjoy a healthier landscape that is just as beautiful as it is today.”

Compost tea comprises humic acid, fish fertilizer, molasses, kelp meal and specially mixed compost. The ingredients are brewed and aerated for 24 hours in a homemade compost tea machine, based on a similar model used at Harvard University.

To educate the Whitworth and Spokane communities on the compost tea program, facilities services has invited soil microbiologist Elaine Ingham, founder of Soil Foodweb, Inc., to campus to share her expertise in fall 2014. Ingham will speak on the compost tea program and will host an educational workshop to help further develop the program at Whitworth. 

Tracy Simmons

About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 15 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash. She is also a Lecture of Strategic Communication at the University of Idaho.

She also writes for The Spokesman-Review and for the Religion News Service.

Visit My Website
View All Posts

Check Also

Poll: Americans rarely seek guidance from clergy

A large majority of Americans make important decisions without calling on religious leaders for advice, according to a new survey released Monday by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.