Home / Commentary / BRIEF: Whitworth to host award-winning filmmaker Jen Marlowe
Jen Marlowe on assignment.

BRIEF: Whitworth to host award-winning filmmaker Jen Marlowe

Share this story!
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Share
Jen Marlowe on assignment.
Jen Marlowe on assignment.

Social justice advocate, filmmaker, author and playwright Jen Marlowe will present “Reflections of Resistance” at Whitworth University at 7 p.m. on Nov. 19 in the Robinson Teaching Theatre in Weyerhaeuser Hall.

Marlowe is a Seattle-based human rights activist. She has worked in conflict resolution for youth in Israel, Afghanistan, Cyprus, India, Pakistan and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

“Jen Marlowe’s lecture will be a unique opportunity to hear about her experiences in Israel, Sudan, Palestine and Bahrain as well as her views regarding capital punishment,” Andriana Siefe, ASWU cultural events coordinator, said, according to a press release.

Marlowe’s most recent book, “I am Troy Davis,” was co-written with Troy Davis’s sister, Martina Davis-Correia, and tells the story of a man who was arrested and executed in spite of a strong case for his innocence. There will be a book signing held in the Whitworth bookstore prior to her lecture.

Marlowe writes extensively about the death penalty and the Palestine and Israel conflict and Sudan. She is also the author of “The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian’s Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker” and “Darfur Diaries: Stories of Survival.”

Additionally, Marlowe is the founder of donkeysaddleprojects.org, which, through film, writing and theatre, seeks to show the strength and resilience of those who have been marginalized and oppressed by society. She has made two award-winning documentary films, “Darfur Diaries: Message from Home” and “Rebuilding Hope.” She also wrote a play, “There is a Field,” which addresses the struggles of Palestinians in Israel.

Josie Camarillo

About Josie Camarillo

Josie Camarillo is a recent graduate of Whitworth University, where she majored in English and psychology. Currently pursuing her Master in Social Work at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, Camarillo writes for SpokaneFAVS from afar, but plans to return to the Spokane area after attaining her licensure as an independent social worker. She dreams of becoming a relationship therapist and a published author. Her hobbies include photography, horseback riding and writing poetry.

Camarillo has a passion for photography and writing, especially poetry, and is interested in creative counseling methods like narrative therapy and using horses in therapy. Someday, she would like to be a counselor and a published poet. Her favorite poems are "The Singing Woman from the Wood's Edge" by Edna St. Vincent Millay and "The Art of Drowning" by Billy Collins.

During fall 2013, Camarillo worked for Spokane Faith & Values as a copy editing intern, where her specialities included deleting Oxford commas and adding hyperlinks. Since then, she has transitioned into becoming a regular contributor to the site as a writer and photographer.

View All Posts
Share

Check Also

Riding for Refugees: Day 1

The nature of endurance bike rides entails constant movement. The key is to get up early, settle into a comfortable pace quickly, and keep moving