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BRIEF: Preventing domestic violence

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On Sept. 27 residents are invited to learn how to prevent domestic violence at the first Stop Violence Against Women Day, which will be held at Coeur d'Alene Casino from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.

The event will include a Women's Health & Resource Fair in partnership with Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

KREM 2 News' Jen York and Laura Pappeti will emcee the event. The theme centers on the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Actress and author Christina Crawford is the lunch keynote speaker and will engage attendees in a heart-to-heart dialogue on the long term effects of raising children in an abusive environment, according to a press release.

Other program speakers include

  • Sarah Foley, the community education and outreach advocate at the Spokane YWCA Alternatives to Domestic Violence Program who will discuss domestic violence within the LGBTQ communities and address the additional barriers that LGBTQ survivors face when seeking services.  
  • Mabel Elsom, the anti-human trafficking coordinator at Lutheran Community Services who will discuss human trafficking and the difference between labor and sex trafficking.
  • Melanie Warner, a fourth degree black belt instructor and owner of Hand to Hand Combat Training Center in Post Falls, Idaho, who will teach self-defense tips that are quick and easy to remember.

The fair will also feature mini-spa treatments, health screenings, beauty must-haves, support groups, and businesses and organizations to empower women physically, spiritually and emotionally, according to a press release.

Tickets are $75 and can be purchased online. All proceeds will benefit the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's STOP Violence Against Women Program.

For information contact Charity Doyl, event chair at (509) 928-9664 or charitydoyl@yahoo.com.

Tracy Simmons

About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 15 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash. She is also a Lecture of Strategic Communication at the University of Idaho.

She also writes for The Spokesman-Review and for the Religion News Service.

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