Home » Commentary » BRIEF: Lecture to address the “mystical-political theology of solidarity”
M. Shawn Copeland/Boston College photo

BRIEF: Lecture to address the “mystical-political theology of solidarity”

Share
M. Shawn Copeland/Boston College photo
M. Shawn Copeland/Boston College photo

M. Shawn Copeland, professor of Catholic systematic theology at Boston College, will deliver Gonzaga University’s 38th annual Flannery Lecture at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, March 20 in the Cataldo Hall Globe Room. The lecture, titled “Toward A Mystical-Political Theology of Solidarity,” is free and open to the public.

Just over 50 years ago in a sermonic address, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., sketched a dream of human and humane living in which “justice would roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream” (Amos 5:24). King’s dream called for purposeful, hope-filled, and sustained action in construction of social justice. According to a press release, Copeland’s lecture asserts that for such action to be effective, it ought to be grounded in certain fundamentals – compassion, conversation, and solidarity. Moreover, the lecture proposes a connection between King’s notion of the beloved community and a notion of the Mystical Body of Christ.

Professor Copeland is a former president of the Catholic Theological Society of America (CTSA), and a former Convener of the Black Catholic Theological Symposium, an interdisciplinary learned association of Black Catholic scholars. She has authored more than 100 publications including “Enfleshing Freedom: Body, Race and Being,” and “The Subversive Power of Love: The Vision of Henriette Delille.”

Gonzaga’s Flannery Lecture, which aims to further excellence in theological study and teaching at Gonzaga, is made possible through a gift of the late Maud and Milo Flannery of Spokane. The Flannery Lecture is delivered each year by an outstanding Catholic theologian and presented to benefit as wide an audience as possible.

 

Tracy Simmons

About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons, who teaches journalism at Gonzaga University, is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 13 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash.

She also writes for The Spokesman-Review and for the Religion News Service.

Visit My Website
View All Posts
Share

Check Also

Ask A Jew: Is it offensive for non-Jews to wear Jewish symbols?

I can tell you that in my experience, most Jewish people who wear a chai, a Star of David, or both (some folks alternate between the two) see them as identifiers that tell the world: “I am Jewish” (and, presumably, “I am proud of being Jewish”).