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Kimberly Burnham

Kimberly Burnham
As a 28 year-old photojournalist, Kimberly Burnham appreciated beauty. Then an ophthalmologist diagnosed her with a genetic condition saying, "Consider life if you become blind." From those devastating words, she forged a healing path with insight and vision. Today, a brain health expert, Kimberly coaches people to experience richer, more nourishing environments. Her PhD in Integrative Medicine and extensive training in Craniosacral Therapy, Reiki, Acupressure, Integrative Manual Therapy, Health Coaching, and Matrix Energetics enable her to serve as a catalyst, gently shifting one's ability to feel better physically, think more clearly, and be more creative. She works at New Moon Family Wellness in Spokane and consults worldwide. Some of her brain and healing work focuses on neurotheology, cardiotheology, Parkinson's disease, and macular degeneration. The poetic, "Live Like Someone Left The Gate Open" chronicles her coming out story after growing up LDS (Mormon). Now a Jew by Choice, Burnham bicycled over 3,000 miles on Hazon's 2013 Cross USA ride raising money for sustainable agriculture and food justice. Through the Creating Calm Network, she assists organizations, authors, and poets in publishing projects and crafting robust social media platforms. Her books include, "Parkinson's Alternatives," "Our Fractal Nature," "Balancing the Sleep Wake Cycle," "30 Poems in 30 Days: Writing Prompts & Poems from Tiferet Journal" and the upcoming "Touched by Parkinson's—Healing Through Poetry" anthology. With her partner, Rabbi Elizabeth Goldstein she edited, "Music—Carrier of Intention in 49 Jewish Prayers." She also writes for Inner Child Magazine and the Poetry Posse's "The Year of the Poet" collective.

Music Carrier of Intention and Cymatics

An underlying principle in Cymatics is that a community that engages with sound: music, singing, or drumming together, comes together on a cellular level.

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Birth, Belief, and Rules: Connecting or Dividing Us?

Jews and Christians are different and one way to understand each other is to ask questions. Sometimes, said Levine, we think, "yes, but shouldn't we already know this" and then we make stuff up because we think we understand it.

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Lose It, Find It, Celebrate, and Eat

On finding ways to create and celebrate Christian-Jewish relations, Levine said, "We must agree to disagree on fundamental issues and agree to agree on even more fundamental issues."

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Rise each day with the new sun

Wherever we are on this world, whatever faith or cultural community we lay claim to, we each have the opportunity to "rise each day with the new sun" and do something magnificent, until we don't.

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