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Ask A Mormon: Which unique tenets of Mormonism do you find most valuable?

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Do you have a question about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints? Submit it online.

Q. Which unique tenets of Mormonism do you find most valuable?

SPO-House-ad_Ask-A-Mormon_0823139A. One of the basic tenets of Mormonism that consistently grounds me is that we are literal children of God. We have a heavenly father and a heavenly mother who love us and want us to be happy and to learn and grow and fulfill our potential. And because we are all children of these perfect, omnipotent parents, every person’s potential is unlimited! As I have experienced parenthood, my appreciation of this principle has deepened immeasurably. The overwhelming love I feel for my children gives me a taste of the love my heavenly parents must feel for each of their children. I watch my boys as they grow and struggle and make mistakes and learn by experience, and I think I understand a little better why our heavenly parents sent us here and what they want for me during our time apart. This principle is fundamental to the way I view myself and how I view every person I meet. Each of us is a child of God who is loved unconditionally and is of infinite worth, and we should treat ourselves and others accordingly.

Latter-day Saints believe in eternal progression. We learn line upon line and precept upon precept (see Isaiah 28). I find that principle to be incredibly encouraging. We are constantly striving to become more like our Savior, Jesus Christ, by following his example and applying his atonement. We are not expected to be perfect this instant, to never make a mistake again, or to know everything right now. It is a progression, and everyone is on his or her own individual journey. Of course we will still mess up — we are imperfect human beings, after all — but with Christ’s help we can be better people and become more like him and our heavenly parents.

We believe in continuing revelation; God is not done revealing truth to the world in general or to each of us in particular. I find our faith’s tradition of asking questions and getting personal answers very individually empowering. The LDS Church was restored because 14-year-old Joseph Smith had a question, asked God directly and received an answer. Much of the Church’s growth and my own personal growth have come because questions were asked and the answers sought through prayer, faith, study, and discussion. Questions open the door for us to receive revelation. We have both the right and the responsibility to communicate directly with God and to receive personal, individual direction for our lives.

 Do you have a question about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints? Submit it online.

Emily Geddes

About Emily Geddes

Emily H. Geddes was born to two physicists and grew up as a Navy brat. Born-and-raised as a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, she holds a bachelor's degree in theatre from Brigham Young University, and earned an MBA from Eastern Washington University.

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