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Matzo ball soup/DepositPhoto

Ask A Jew: Help! I Need Matzo Ball Soup

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By Neal Schindler

I am desperate to find matzo ball soup in the Spokane or Coeur d’Alene area. This is an emergency. Thank you for any help you can provide.

Oh, man. If this really is a genuine matzo-ball-soup emergency — and I sense from your tone that it is — I have some bad news for you. I’ve lived here more than seven years, and I’ve yet to find a local restaurant that makes matzo ball soup.

So here, I think, are your choices:

  1. Befriend a Jewish person in, like, the next 30 minutes (or, apparently, befriend acclaimed local poet Kate Lebo) and find an offhand, casual, entirely unforced way to determine whether your new Jewish friend makes matzo ball soup;
  2. Learn to make matzo ball soup yourself; or
  3. Drive to Seattle.

Recent buzz suggests that on the West Side, Dingfelder’s Delicatessen is the hot new place to go for all things culinarily Jewish. Below is a picture of their matzo ball soup, which I swiped from their Facebook page:

Hey, if you start driving now, you can be there in… four and a half hours? Give or take.

Neal Schindler

About Neal Schindler

A native of Detroit, Neal Schindler has lived in the Pacific Northwest since 2002. He has held staff positions at Seattle Weekly and The Seattle Times and was a freelance writer for Jew-ish.com from 2007 to 2011. Schindler was raised in a Reconstructionist Jewish congregation and is now a member of Spokane's Reform congregation, Emanu-El. He is the director of Spokane Area Jewish Family Services. His interests include movies, Scrabble, and indie rock. He lives with his wife, son, and two cats in West Central Spokane.

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