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A Generous Peaceful New Year

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by Kimberly Burnham

As we move into a new year, let’s consider what peace means to ourselves, to our friends and families, and our neighbors near and far. In this year’s column, I will consider the meaning of peace in different languages around the world.

In English, synonyms for peace include calm, tranquility, serenity, and harmony. Those nuances of peace are often included in other languages but there are even more meanings and synonyms for peace when you look in the cultures, languages, and dictionaries of the world. Exploring those meanings can contribute to brain health (learning something new or looking at something in a new way) as well as develop inner peace, resilience and well-being.

Imagine if the seven or eight billion people who share this earth were to think about peace for five minutes a day. What would change?

A Gentle, Generous Peace

What do peaceful, generous and gentle

have in common

“manókuradj” in Burū́šaskī Hunza spoken in Pakistan

Burushaski (bsk) or Burū́šaskī Hunza is a language isolate or a language unrelated to any other known language spoken by the Burusho people in northern Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. Here are some of the words for peace in Burushaski: “Aram” (peace), “Saláamn” (peace), “Suc̣uméiny” (getting on well, peace), “Sukóonny” (peace), “Manókuradj” (peaceful, generous, gentle), “Dumaaẏasvi” (live in peace, reconcile), or Aman-amaanny (peace, safety).

With these words, consider the relationship between generosity and peace both inner peace and world peace in your life.

Generous Peace and a Light Liver

“Arun eyoyóiq” means he is generous

or he is happy and peaceful

literally his liver is light or not heavy

in Awa (awb) spoken in Papua New Guinea

“Aru máréhq” he is generous

literally he puts his liver into it

not his shoulder, his liver

the seat of giving all

“Aru matíéhq” he is stingy

he is hard hearted

he is worried

literally he has his liver

As if when we are generous

we have so much more

than just our selves

we have peace

health and an open heart

Awa (awb), also known as Ilakia, Mobuta, Northeast Awa, South Awa, and Tauna is spoken in Papua New Guinea, a small Pacific island nation with hundreds of languages..Here are some words for peace in Awa: “Arun eyoyóiq (he is generous or he is happy and peaceful, literally his liver is light or not heavy) and “Séhréh aite” (peace).

Consider the impact of generosity of spirit, money, time, or a smile on your overall peace and comfort in life.

Mutelela a Generous Peace

“Mutele” is generous in Lakalai or Nakanai

to be generous and kind

“Lamutele” a good or generous man

“latahalo” or “lamutelela” a kind man

“Telela” is also peace

the peace inside a kind and generous person

“Telela” is peace in Lakalai or Nakanai, a language of New Britain, one of the largest of the 600 plus islands that make up Papua New Guinea.

What kind of person do you want to be known as this year? What do you want to have on the inside?

In our search for peace, the languages of Burushaski (Pakistan), Awa (Papua New Guinea), and Lakalai (Papua New Guinea) encourage us to open ourselves to generosity.

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About Kimberly Burnham

Kimberly Burnham
Kimberly Burnham is the author of the recent book, "Awakenings: Peace Dictionary, Language and the Mind, A Daily Brain Health Program." In Awakenings, Kimberly investigates the relationship between memory, language, caring and pattern recognition, creating a daily brain health exercise program enabling people to achieve better neurological health, mood and quality of life. With a PhD in Integrative Medicine, Kimberly is known as The Nerve Whisperer. She uses words (books, presentations, and poetry), health coaching, guided visualization, and hands-on therapies (CranioSacral therapy, acupressure, Matrix Energetics, Reiki, and Integrative Manual Therapy) to help people with healing. She assists people with movement disorders and walking issues due to Parkinson's disease, Huntington's ataxia, and Diabetic neuropathies. Alternative approaches for autoimmune conditions like multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, Lyme disease or lupus are also available. Kimberly's practice includes children with seizures, autism, cerebral palsy, scoliosis, Down's, sleep and anxiety disorders. A Professional Health Coach, she consults with people via phone and Skype as well as working with clients in person in Spokane, Washington, where she lives with her family. She also focuses on vision issues like macular degeneration and supports people looking for eye exercises to improve driving and reading skills as well as athletic visual speed. An award-winning poet, Kimberly grew up overseas. The child of an international businessman and an artist, she learned Spanish in Colombia; French in Belgium; then Japanese in Tokyo and has studied both Italian and Hebrew as an adult. She can be reached at NerveWhisperer@gmail.com or http://www.NerveWhisperer.Solutions.

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