Wednesday, Jul 26, 2017
Home » News » World Vision Humanitarian Response Director to speak in Spokane
Photo of Khalil Sleiman courtesy First Presbyterian Church, Spokane

World Vision Humanitarian Response Director to speak in Spokane

Share

This weekend Khalil Sleiman, World Vision‘s Humanitarian Response director, will visit First Presbyterian Church to discuss his extensive work with World Vision in the Middle East, most recently with the Syria Response Team.

According to an announcement Sleiman brings first hand knowledge of the current situation in the Middle East, and draws upon his own childhood experience of war and displacement, as he comes from a small village in southern Lebanon and lost his home and land during the Lebanese Civil War.

“As a committed Christ follower, he also will bring stories and perspectives from Christians who live in the region, and offer opportunities for us to partner with World Vision’s work through prayer, engagement, advocacy, and sacrificial giving,” that announcement reads.

His discussion will be at the church, 318 S Cedar St, Spokane, Washington 99201, Sunday  (April 30) at 7 p.m.

Tracy Simmons

About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons, who teaches journalism at Gonzaga University, is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 13 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash.

She also writes for The Spokesman-Review and for the Religion News Service.

Visit My Website
View All Posts
Share

Comments

comments

Check Also

Charlie Gard’s parents end legal fight to take him to U.S. for treatment

The court previously ruled that Gard’s life-support machine should be switched off and that he should be allowed die with “dignity.”

Share