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The farce of moral superiority

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By Mark Azzara

The famed Rev. Eugene Peterson recently retracted a one-word comment that appeared to support gay marriage. From what I read he took extraordinary heat for his initial comment. Some say his reputation has been ruined despite his retraction. And others say it’s been ruined because of that retraction.

I don’t want to address gay marriage in this letter. What you and I believe is what we believe.

But I feel compelled to write about the pressure we increasingly put on one another to believe and proclaim the “right” thing. It appears we are growing very quick to condemn those with whom we disagree.

Gay marriage isn’t a political issue anymore. It’s legal in all 50 states, whether some people like it or not. Our opinions don’t matter.

Gay marriage is a choice that two people make. The opinions of those around them don’t matter.

So why do we demand to know the opinions of anyone or everyone else? Why should anyone be required to pass someone else’s moral litmus test?

The answer is simple. We can’t resist the temptation to stereotype and then criticize and reject those with whom we disagree. We all want to feel morally superior to others. Flash! We’re not. We are all equal. And God is morally superior to all of us.

All God’s blessings – Mark

Mark Azzara

About Mark Azzara

Mark Azzara spent 45 years in print journalism, most of them with the Waterbury Republican in Connecticut, where he was a features writer with a special focus on religion at the time of his retirement. He also worked for newspapers in New Haven and Danbury, Conn. At the latter paper, while sports editor, he won a national first-place writing award on college baseball. Azzara also has served as the only admissions recruiter for a small Catholic college in Connecticut and wrote a self-published book on spirituality, "And So Are You." He is active in his church and a non-denominational prayer community and facilitates two Christian study groups for men. Azzara grew up in southern California, graduating from Cal Sate Los Angeles. He holds a master's degree from the University of Connecticut.

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