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Winter landscape in Spokane/Josie Camarillo - SpokaneFAVS

POEM: Changing of the Seasons

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By Christi Ortiz

The seasons teach me much.

I learn not to attach to the joys

that each brings with her.

I learn not to fear the sorrows and the hardships

that another brings along,

but I welcome them all as long, lost dear friends.

Receiving what they have to teach me

and letting go of what they take with them,

when they leave as gracefully as they came.

Only when you’ve sat through many seasons 

do you have the knowing to sit still 

when the storms come,

to not be shaken by the winds of trial 

or the disappearance of consolations.

One learns not to attach to 

the pleasant warmth of summer

or despair in the bitter cold of winter

or lose hope during the barren droughts 

that endure.

But rather watch them all pass by

through the safety of your seat 

upon the cushion of mindfulness.

This endurance roots a faith so deep

that no passing emotion, fear, or sorrow

can steal away.

For she is hidden deep beneath 

the changing weather

in the dark and musty anchor

of the Eternal.

Christi Ortiz

About Christi Ortiz

Christi Ortiz is a licensed marriage and family therapist by profession and a poet by passion.  She enjoys trying to put to words to that which is wordless and give voice to the dynamic and wild spiritual journey called life. She lives in Spokane with her husband and two children, Emmanuel and Grace. She loves the outdoors and meditating in the early mornings which gives rise to her poetry.

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