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March for Science to take place downtown April 22

Fields of Science by Image Editor/Flickr

March for Science to take place downtown April 22

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Spokane will host the first March for Science on Earth Day, April 22, from 1-5 p.m. at the Riverfront Park Clock Tower.

The march’s mission states that it supports “robustly funded and publically communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity.” Its goals are to humanize science, partner with the public, advocate for inclusive and accessible science, support scientists, and affirm science as a democratic value.

Marches will take place throughout the U.S. on April 22, including one in Washington D.C., in response to what is often seen as the Trump administration’s “anti-science stance,” and skepticism about global warming and evolution, according to “The Guardian.”

More information can be found on the March for Science – Spokane page on Facebook, and visit the March for Science website to purchase merchandise or donate to the cause.

Megan Carroll

About Megan Carroll

Megan Carroll is a senior journalism major and interdisciplinary arts minor — which combines her passions for music, theater and dance — at Gonzaga University. Her professional writing experience apart from FāVS includes work with Gonzaga’s Marketing and Communications department (Gonzaga News Service and Gonzaga Magazine), freelance feature and entertainment writing with local daily The Spokesman-Review, and freelance writing for Northwest Catholic Magazine’s website. When she is not writing, Megan enjoys hanging out with adults diagnosed with developmental disabilities at GU Specialized Recreation, singing in voice lessons or GU Concert Choir, dancing, enjoying the outdoors, exercising, and spending time with her wonderful friends and family. A Las Vegas native and avid hiker, she enjoys the beautiful scenery, change of pace and different climate in Spokane. She worshipped in the non-denominational Christian church throughout most of her life, but was recently baptized and confirmed a Catholic. Discussions surrounding interreligious dialogue and religious pluralism in coursework and beyond have led her to many religion reporting passion projects.

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  • James Downard

    I’ll be there. Science is critical to our future, both in the public understanding of it, and the open independent pursuit of it by scientists not pressured by political or ideological forces. The stakes could not be higher in the Trumplandia Era.

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