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December 2014 Coffee Talk

“Faith and Consumerism” 

The more we buy, the less we feel?” by Nicole Sheets

I aspire to eat healthy, minimally processed foods that I prepare myself, with local  ingredients, in my own kitchen. (READ MORE).

Faith and Consumerism: The forgotten gift” by Nicholas Damasus

Rampant consumerism can be seen as the exploitation of the consumer. (READ MORE)

More than Enough” by Carrie Lockhert

They filed in one by one, heads down, reluctant to meet a welcoming smile, unsure of what they might find. (READ MORE)

Lent Vs. Zappos by Carrie Lockhert

I remember during Lent last year how I sat in the pew listening to the sermon about how we are dust and we will return to dust and I remember I felt myself rebelling (READ MORE)

The solution to consumerism by Corbin Croy

Remember that part of the Bible where it says that you cannot serve both God and money? (READ MORE)

Tracy Simmons

About Tracy Simmons

Tracy Simmons, who teaches journalism at Gonzaga University, is an award winning journalist specializing in religion reporting, digital entrepreneurship and social journalism. In her 13 years on the religion beat, Simmons has tucked a notepad in her pocket and found some of her favorite stories aboard cargo ships in New Jersey, on a police chase in Albuquerque, in dusty Texas church bell towers, on the streets of New York and in tent cities in Haiti.
Simmons has worked as a multimedia journalist for newspapers across New Mexico, Texas and Connecticut. Currently she serves as the executive director of SpokaneFAVS.com, a digital journalism start-up covering religion news and commentary in Spokane, Wash.

She also writes for The Spokesman-Review and for the Religion News Service.

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Can journalists truly be unbiased?

So is truth relative? Can it even be pursued or attempted by human journalists? How about readers? Truth is not one source. It should be the voice of the many, not the voice of the few.