Thursday, Jun 29, 2017
Home » Commentary » A house divided
Flickr photo by Sergio Vassio Photography

A house divided

Share

By Mark Azzara

Dear Friend,

Given my letter two weeks ago I know I may sound like a broken record but consider …

Representatives of Europe’s Catholic and Orthodox Christian churches met recently to discuss the theme: “Europe in fear of the threat from fundamentalist terrorism, and the value of the human person and religious freedom.’’ Their conclusion: While governments can guarantee basic rights, other forces are trying “to marginalize or eliminate religion from the public square,” according to a news article. Translation: Return to your Christian roots or risk going “adrift.”

While keeping that thought in mind, step back and look at the condition of the American political landscape. What you’ll see on both sides is increasing animosity, derision, arrogance and disregard for the other side. A recent poll found rare agreement among Democrats, Republicans and independents that our nation is losing its identity but also found there is huge disagreement about what that identity is.

Now, put those two thoughts together and consider what Jesus said: “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” If and when you allow the reality of that truth to sink in, and if you believe there is a God, I invite you to start praying for the so-called “developed” world because, at the moment, it looks like anything but.

All God’s blessings – Mark

 

Mark Azzara

About Mark Azzara

Mark Azzara spent 45 years in print journalism, most of them with the Waterbury Republican in Connecticut, where he was a features writer with a special focus on religion at the time of his retirement. He also worked for newspapers in New Haven and Danbury, Conn. At the latter paper, while sports editor, he won a national first-place writing award on college baseball. Azzara also has served as the only admissions recruiter for a small Catholic college in Connecticut and wrote a self-published book on spirituality, "And So Are You." He is active in his church and a non-denominational prayer community and facilitates two Christian study groups for men. Azzara grew up in southern California, graduating from Cal Sate Los Angeles. He holds a master's degree from the University of Connecticut.

View All Posts
Share

Comments

comments

Check Also

Ask a Buddhist: What is right understanding?

In general, the eightfold path is found within the four noble truths.

Share